Scam Alerts

The Bank of Holland is committed to providing a safe and secure banking environment for its clients.  As internet scams continue to rise, we are dedicated to safeguarding your financial information entrusted with us.  In the section below, we have outlined various recent fraudulent schemes that can help you become aware of such attempts.

 



October 7, 2013

Phishing Email Alert:

A new phishing email is circulating, claiming to be from WellsFargo. The email may contain an attachment. If you have received an email like this, please delete the message immediately. See the message below as an example of what this email may look like.
 
From: Sharron_Skinner@wellsfargo.com [mailto:Sharron_Skinner@wellsfargo.com]
Sent: Monday, October 07, 2013 2:59 PM
To:
Subject: Documents – WellsFargo
 
Please review attached files.
 
Sharron_Skinner
Wells Fargo Advisors
817-833-7815 office
817-286-8932 cell
Sharron_Skinner@wellsfargo.com
 
Investments in securities and insurance products are:
NOT FDIC-INSURED/NO BANK-GUARANTEES/MAY LOSE VALUE
 
Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC is a nonbank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company, Member FINRA/SIPC. 1 North Jefferson, St. Louis, MO 63103
 
CONFIDENTIAL NOTICE: The contents of this message, including any attachments, are confidential and are intended solely for the use of the person or entity to whom the message was addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please be advised that any dissemination, distribution, or use of the contents of this message is strictly prohibited. If you received this message in error, please notify the sender. Please also permanently delete all copies of the original message and any attached documentation. Thank you.
 
 



August 12, 2013

Mail Scam Alert:

A new mail scam is circulating that targets corporations. LARA has alerted Michigan businesses of a scheme collecting $125 fee to prepare annual minutes. Please take a moment to read the linked article from the State’s website, http://www.michigan.gov/som/0,4669,7-192-53480_53484-295672--,00.html.
 




March 22, 2013

Phishing Email Alert

Several clients, as well as employees within the corporation, have received an email where the subject line states their “ACH file has been done with errors”. Please understand these email messages are not coming from our Bank.

EXAMPLE:

From: Data Processing Service [mailto:customerservice@dataprocessingservice.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2013 10:58 AM
To:
Subject: ACH file ID "542.856" has been done with errors

 

ACH Processing Service
SUCCESS Note

We have successfully complete ACH file 'ACH2013-03-20-2.txt' (id '542.856') submitted by user 'XXXXXXX' (Client Name) on '2013-03-20 3:13:02.0'.
FILE SUMMARY:
Item count: 65
Total debits: $ (All different dollar amounts)
Total credits: $(Same as above)
For addidional details XXXXXXXXXX (link)

 


March 11, 2013

Automated Call Scam Alert

In the event you receive a telephone call stating your debit card has been deactivated, please do not respond to the request. This is not a call initiated by The Bank of Holland.
 


February 29, 2012

False Direct Deposit Transfer Failure Notice

Phishing emails claiming to be a notice that your ACH Direct Deposit transfer has failed due to a limitimposed on the receipient account have been circulating.

The e-mail claims to be from a representative of "NACHA" and provides a link.

The e-mail and link are fraudulent.  Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.
NACHA does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders. If you have clicked on a link in an email similar to this and have provided account information, please contact us immediately
so we can take the proper precautions to protect your account.


February 22, 2012

Phishing Alert: Fake Email Claiming to be from the Better Business Bureau

A new phishing email is circulating, claiming to be from the Better Business Bureau. This email claims to be referencing a complaint case filed against the company and directs the recipient to click on a link for more information.

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided. If you have clicked on a link in an email similar to this and have provided account information, please contact us immediately so we can take the proper precautions to protect your account.

For more information visit the Better Business Bureau's News Center.


February 17, 2012

Phishing Alert: Fake Email Claiming to be from PayPal

A new phishing email is circulating, claiming to be from PayPal with the subject line "Billing Address Change Notification".

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided. If you have clicked on a link in an email similar to this and have provided account information, please contact us immediately so we can take the proper precautions to protect your account.

For more information visit PayPal's Security and Protection Center.


February 7, 2012

Phishing Alert: Fake Email Claiming to be from Intuit

A new phishing email is circulating, claiming to be from Intuit with the subject line "Tax Information Needed with 30 days".

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided. If you have clicked on a link in an email similar to this and have provided account information, please contact us immediately so we can take the proper precautions to protect your account.

For more information visit Intuit's Online Security Center.


January 27, 2012

Phishing Alert: Fraudulent Emails Regarding Debit Cards

Phishing emails claiming to be a notice of fraudulent activity on your debit card have been circulating. These notices are not from the bank and you should not reply to them or click any links contained in the email. Emails may appear similiar to the info below:

--------------------------------------------------

From: eNFACT Notifications
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 11:50 AM
To: Recipients

Subject: eNFACT Case xxxxxxxxxxxx

To protect your account, we monitor your ATM and debit card transactions for potentially fraudulent activity which may include a sudden change in locale (such as when a U.S.-issued card is used unexpectedly overseas), a sudden string of costly purchases, or any pattern associated with new fraud trends around the world.

An eNFACT Case was generated for the cardholder below:

Transaction 1 Information:
A charge on 10/23/2011 in the amount of $438.09 in ITALY  
Transaction Score: 981

Transaction 2 Information:
A charge on 10/23/2011 in the amount of $513.14 in ITALY  
Transaction Score: 918

--------------------------------------------------

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided. If you have clicked on a link in an email similar to this and have provided account information, please contact us immediately so we can take the proper precautions to protect your account.
 


December 30, 2011

Fraudulent Letters Claiming to be from The Bank of Holland

We have received reports of a fraudulent letter claiming to be from The Bank of Holland. The letter claims to be a “Payment Reduction Notice Administrative Office: Important Information Regarding your Loan with The Bank of Holland”. 

The letter states that based on public information the recipient may qualify for a payment reduction. It also goes on to state that the recipient may have been a victim of predatory lending.  The letter claims that they will run an investigation of the recipient’s records and gives a number to call.  When you call this number the receiver identifies themselves as “Home Retention.”

If you have received this letter, please do not respond.  If you have responded to this letter and given out your personal information (including Social Security number, Account numbers or Date of Birth), please let us know so we can take the appropriate steps to protect your account.


October 21, 2001

False ACH Transfer Failure Notice

Phishing emails claiming to be a notice that your ACH transfer has failed due to technical error have been circulating.

The e-mail claims to be from a representative of "NACHA" and provides a link.

The e-mail and link are fraudulent.  Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.
The NACHA does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


October 11, 2011

False E-mails Claiming to Be From the FDIC

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The e-mail appears to be sent from a "regulations@fdic.gov" e-mail address and has a subject line that reads: "2011 updated FDIC regulations."

The e-mail starts out by saying "New Regulation approved for the FDI act expected to be implemented untill december 2011." (note: Typographical errors are included). The e-mail attempts to trick recipients into clicking on a link directing recipients to a fraudulent Web site.

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.
The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.


September 29, 2011

False FTC Emails

The FTC has warned that spammers have sent emails that appear to be from the FTC. These emails claim a complaint has been filed against the business. If you get an unexpected email claiming to be from the FTC do not open it, click on any links or open any attachments. For more information visit the FTC's Website.


September 1, 2011

FDIC Phishing Email Alert

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that appear to be from the FDIC and contain an infected attachment.

The fraudulent e-mails have addresses such as "no.reply@fdic.gov" or "notify84zma@fdic.gov" on the "From" line. The message appears, with spelling and grammatical errors, as follows:

Subject line: "FDIC notification"

Message body:

"Dear customer,

Your account ACH and WIRE transaction have been temporarily suspended for security reasons due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest installations read the document(pdf) attached below.

As soon as it is setup, you transaction abilities will be fully restored.

Best Regards, Online Security departament, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

The e-mails contain an attachment "FDIC_document.zip" that will likely release malicious software if opened. These e-mails and attachments are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider these e-mails an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT open the attachment.

Consumers should be aware that these fraudulent e-mails may be modified over time with other subject lines, sender names, and narratives. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers, nor does the FDIC request bank customers to install software upgrades.

Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents, and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 3501 North Fairfax Drive, CH-11034, Arlington, Virginia 22226, or transmitted electronically to alert@fdic.gov. Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.
For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2011/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html
 


September 1, 2011

Phishing Alert-ACH Emails

Reminder, NACHA does not send emails regarding ACH transactions. There has been an increase in fraudulent emails typically make reference to an ACH transfer, payment, or transaction and contain a link or attachment that infects the computer with malicious code when clicked on by the email recipient. The source address and contents of these fraudulent emails vary, with more recent examples often including a counterfeit NACHA logo and the citation of NACHA’s physical mailing address and telephone number.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to persons or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive. Be suspicious of any email claiming to be from NACHA, or emails regarding ACH transactions that do not come from an @tboh.com or @lmfc.com email address.

Do not to open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual. Forward suspected fraudulent emails appearing to come from NACHA to abuse@nacha.org to aid in our efforts with security experts and law enforcement officials to pursue the perpetrators.

Always use up-to-date anti-virus software. Ensure that operating system and common software application security patches are installed and current. If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.


June 6, 2011

Fraudulent FDIC Emails

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being from the FDIC.

The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or "accounts@fdic.gov."

They have subject lines that read: "FDIC: Your business account" or "FDIC: About Your Business Account."

The e-mails are addressed to "Business Customer" or "Business Owner" and state "We have important information about your bank" or "…financial institution." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details."

They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

These e-mails and the link included are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider the intent of these e-mails as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mails and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.

Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that other subject lines and modifications to the e-mails may occur over time. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers in this manner nor does the FDIC request personal financial information from consumers.

For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's Website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2011/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through email, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.
Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.
 


Phishing Alert Update 5/29/2011

Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from NACHA
Further to notices issued on March 11 and February 22, 2011, NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies continue to receive fraudulent emails that have the appearance of having been sent from NACHA. These emails vary in content and appear to be transmitted from email addresses associated with the NACHA domain (@nacha.org). Some bear the name of fictitious NACHA employees and/or departments.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to persons or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.
 
If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.
 
Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated.
 
Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software application security patches are installed and current.

Additional information and guidance on phishing is available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).


March 14, 2011

Fedwire Phishing Alert

Below is a copy of a fraudulent email that appears to be from the Federal Reserve. The subject line states that a Wire Transfer  was canceled. It encourages the recipient to click on a link to view further information.

Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.

 


The Bank of Holland has received reports of a Phishing email being sent to clients claiming to be from The National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA). Below is the alert NACHA has posted on their website, www.nacha.org.

NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies have received a fraudulent email that has the appearance of having been sent from NACHA and signed by a non-existent NACHA employee. Specifically, this email claims to be from the “Electronic Payments Association” and appears to be coming from the email address "payments@nacha.org.” See a sample of the email below.

Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.

NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to individuals or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

  • If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.
  • Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated.
  • Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software applications security patches are installed and current.
  • Be alert for different variations of fraudulent emails.

= = = = = Sample Email = = = = = =
From:payments@nacha.org [mailto:payments@nacha.org]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:32 AM
To: Doe, John
Subject: ACH transaction rejected
The ACH transaction, recently sent from your checking account (by you or any other person), was cancelled by the Electronic Payments Association.
Please click here to view report
------------------------------------------------------------------
Otto Tobin,
Risk Manager
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =


July 2, 2010

Below is a copy of a fraudulent email that appears to be from the IRS. The subject line states: “Notice of Underreported Income”. It encourages the recipient to click on a link to review their tax statement.

If you click on the link, a very powerful password stealing program is installed on your computer.
 
Please remember, the IRS has stated emphatically that it does not communicate with citizens via e-mail.
 

March 16, 2010

Read about the latest scams and threats in the posting below. This update was issued by the FDIC.
 
RENTAL AND REAL ESTATE SCAMS
 

Individuals need to be cautious when posting rental properties and real estate on-line. The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) continues to receive numerous complaints from individuals who have fallen victim to scams involving rentals of apartments and houses, as well as postings of real estate online.

Rental scams occur when the victim has rental property advertised and is contacted by an interested party. Once the rental price is agreed-upon, the scammer forwards a check for the deposit on the rental property to the victim. The check is to cover housing expenses and is, either written in excess of the amount required, with the scammer asking for the remainder to be remitted back, or the check is written for the correct amount, but the scammer backs out of the rental agreement and asks for a refund. Since the banks do not usually place a hold on the funds, the victim has immediate access to them and believes the check has cleared. In the end, the check is found to be counterfeit and the victim is held responsible by the bank for all losses.

Another type of scam involves real estate that is posted via classified advertisement websites. The scammer duplicates postings from legitimate real estate websites and reposts these ads, after altering them. Often, the scammers use the broker’s real name to create a fake e-mail, which gives the fraud more legitimacy. When the victim sends an e-mail through the classified advertisement website inquiring about the home, they receive a response from someone claiming to be the owner. The “owner” claims he and his wife are currently on missionary work in a foreign country. Therefore, he needs someone to rent their home while they are away. If the victim is interested in renting the home, they are asked to send money to the owner in the foreign country.

If you have been a victim of Internet crime, please file a complaint at http://www.IC3.gov/.
 


March 9, 2010

U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2010 CENSUS CAMPAIGN WARNING
 

US-CERT (Computer Emergency Readiness Team) asks users to be vigilant during the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census campaign and to watch for potential census scams.

According to the U.S. Census 2010 website, they began delivery of the printed census forms to every resident in the United States on March 1, 2010. The only way to complete the census is by filling in the form using pen and ink; in some instances, census takers will be visiting households to complete the form face-to-face.
It is important to understand that the U.S. Census Bureau will not, under any circumstances, be providing an online option to complete the 2010 census form.

US-CERT encourages all residents in the United States to take the following measures to protect themselves:

  • Review available information about the 2010 U.S. Census on the website.
  • Familiarize yourself with what information the U.S. Census Bureau is collecting on the census form.
  • Do not follow unsolicited web links of attachments in email messages.

January 21, 2010

Read about the latest scams and threats in the posting below. This update was issued by the FDIC. 

NEW TWIST ON COUNTERFEIT CHECK SCHEMES TARGETING U.S. LAW FIRMS

The FBI continues to receive reports of counterfeit check schemes targeting U.S. law firms. As previously reported, scammers send e-mails to lawyers, claiming to be overseas and seeking legal representation to collect delinquent payments from third parties in the U.S. The law firm receives a retainer agreement, invoices reflecting the amount owed, and a check payable to the law firm. The firm is instructed to extract the retainer fee, including any other fees associated with the transaction, and wire the remaining funds to banks in Korea, China, Ireland, or Canada. By the time the check is determined to be counterfeit, the funds have already been wired overseas.
 
In a new twist, the fraudulent client seeking legal representation is an ex-wife "on assignment" in an Asian country, and she claims to be pursuing a collection of divorce settlement monies from her ex-husband in the U.S. The law firm agrees to represent the ex-wife, sends an e-mail to the ex-husband, and receives a "certified" check for the settlement via delivery service. The ex-wife instructs the firm to wire the funds, less the retainer fee, to an overseas bank account. When the scam is executed successfully, the law firm wires the money before discovering the check is counterfeit.
 
All Internet users need to be cautious when they receive unsolicited e-mails. Law firms are advised to conduct as much due diligence as possible before engaging in transactions with parties who are handling their business solely via e-mail, particularly those parties claiming to reside overseas.

Read about the latest scams and threats in the posting below. This update was issued by the FDIC.

Should you receive a pop-up advertisement offering an anti-virus software, do not follow the links or prompts.

POP-UP ADVERTISEMENTS OFFERING ANTI-VIRUS SOFTWARE POSE THREAT TO INTERNET USERS

An ongoing threat exists for computer users who, while browsing the Internet, began receiving pop-up security warnings that state their computers are infected with numerous viruses.
These pop-ups known as scareware, fake, or rogue anti-virus software look authentic and may even display what appears to be real-time anti-virus scanning of the user’s hard drive. The scareware will show a list of reputable software icons; however, the user cannot click a link to go to the actual site to review or see recommendations.

The scareware is intimidating to most users and extremely aggressive in its attempt to lure the user into purchasing the rogue software that will allegedly remove the viruses from their computer. It is possible that these threats are received as a result of clicking on advertisements contained on a website. Cyber criminals use botnets to push the software and use advertisements on websites to deliver it. This is known as malicious advertising or malvertising. Once the pop-up appears it cannot be easily closed by clicking “close” or the “X” button. If the user clicks on the pop-up to purchase the software, a form is provided that collects payment information and the user is charged for the bogus product. In some instances, whether the user clicks on the pop-up or not, the scareware can install malicious code onto the computer. By running your computer with an account that has rights to install software, this issue is more likely to occur.

Downloading the software could result in viruses, Trojans, and/or keyloggers being installed on the user’s computer. The repercussions of downloading the malicious software could prove further financial loss to the victim due to computer repair, as well as, cost to the user and/or financial institutions due to identity theft.

The assertive tactics of the scareware has caused significant losses to users. The FBI is aware of an estimated loss to victims in excess of $150 million.

Be cautious—Cyber criminals use easy to remember names and associate them with known applications. Beware of pop-ups that are offer a variation of recognized security software. It is recommended that the user research the exact name of the software being offered.

Take precautions to ensure operating systems are updated and security software is current. If a user receives these anti-virus pop-ups, it is recommended to close the browser or shut the system down. It is suggested that the user run a full, anti-virus scan whenever the computer is turned back on.
 


November 12, 2009

A random sampling of clients and employees of The Bank of Holland have received a falsified e-mail with the subject title "Rejected ACH Transaction." This e-mail appears to be from NACHA - The Electronic Payments Association announcing that there is a problem with an ACH transaction they have originated. The e-mail includes a link which redirects the individual to a fake web page which appears like the NACHA website and contains a link which is almost certainly an executable virus with malware. (Sample e-mail below)

Please be aware that the e-mail did not originate from NACHA, and the website is not that of NACHA's. Should you receive this email, delete it immediately. Do not click on the link.


= = = = = Sample E-mail = = = = = =

From: nacha.org [mailto:report@nacha.org]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2009 10:25 AM
To: Doe, John
Subject: Rejected ACH transaction, please review the transaction report

Dear bank account holder,
The ACH transaction, recently initiated from your bank account, was rejected by the Electronic Payments Association. Please review the transaction report by clicking the link below:

Unauthorized ACH Transaction Report (example link presentation)


October 28, 2009

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has become aware of e-mails appearing to be sent from the FDIC that are asking recipients to download and open a "personal FDIC insurance file" to check their deposit insurance coverage. These e-mails are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. The FDIC is attempting to identify the source of the e-mails and disrupt the transmission.

Currently, the subject line of the fraudulent e-mails includes the wording "check your Bank Deposit Insurance Coverage." The e-mails state: "You have received this message because you are a holder of a FDIC-insured bank account. Recently FDIC has officially named the bank you have opened your account with as a failed bank, thus, taking control of its assets."

The e-mails ask recipients to "visit the official FDIC website" by clicking on a hyperlink provided, which appears to be related to the FDIC and directs recipients to a fraudulent Web site. The Web site includes hyperlinks that appear to open forms. However, it is believed that clicking on the hyperlinks will cause an unknown executable file to be downloaded. While the FDIC is working with the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) to determine the exact effects of the executable file, recipients should consider the intent of the software as a malicious attempt to collect personal or confidential information, some of which may be used to gain unauthorized access to online banking services or to conduct identity theft. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT access the Web site or download the executable files provided on the Web site.

Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 550 17th Street, N.W., Room F-3054, Washington, D.C. 20429, or transmitted electronically to alert@fdic.gov. Information related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at https://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.

For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's website at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2009/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.
 


October 13, 2009

Read about the latest email scams and threats in the postings below.  Each of these updates were issued by the FDIC.

Should you receive these or similar emails, do not follow the links or prompts.

FRAUDULENT E-MAIL CLAIMING TO CONTAIN FBI
“INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN NO. 267”

10/05/09—A fraudulent e-mail message claiming to contain a confidential FBI report titled “New Patterns in Al-Qaeda Financing” has been circulating since August 15, 2009. The e-mail has the subject line “Intelligence Bulletin No. 267,” and contains an attachment titled “bulletin.exe.” This message, or similar messages, may contain files that are harmful to the recipient’s system and may try to steal user credentials.

DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS E-MAIL OR SIMILAR E-MAILS, IT IS A HOAX.

The FBI does not send unsolicited e-mails or email official reports. Consumers should not respond to any unsolicited e-mails or click on any embedded links, as they may contain viruses or other malicious software.

Below is an example of the fraudulent e-mail message:

INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN No. 267
Title: New Patterns in Al-Qaeda Financing
Date: August 15, 2009
THREAT LEVEL: YELLOW (ELEVATED)

THE INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN PROVIDES LAW ENFORCEMENT AND OTHER PUBLIC SAFET= OFFICIALS WITH SITUATIONAL AWARENESS CONCERNING INTERNATIONAL AND DOMES=IC TERRORIST GROUPS AND TACTICS.

HANDLING NOTICE: Recipients are reminded that FBI Intelligence Bulletins =ontain sensitive terrorism and counterterrorism information meant for us= primarily within the law enforcement community. Such bulletins are not =o be released either in written or oral form to the media, the general p=blic, or other personnel who do not have a valid ?eed-to-know?with=ut prior approval from an authorized FBI official, as such release could jeopardize national security

As with many fraudulent e-mail messages, this message contains multiple spelling errors and poor grammar.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FRAUDULENT E-MAIL CLAIMING TO BE FROM DHS AND THE FBI COUNTERTERRORISM DIVISION

10/05/09—Fraudulent e-mails containing the subject line “New DHS Report” have been circulating since August 15, 2009. The e-mails claim to be from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the FBI Counterterrorism Division. The e-mail text contains information about “New Usama Bin Ladin Speech Directed to the People of Europe,” and has an attachment titled “audio.exe.” The attachment is purportedly an audio speech from Bin Ladin; however, it actually contains malicious software intended to steal information from the recipient’s system.

DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS E-MAIL OR SIMILAR E-MAILS, IT IS A HOAX.

The FBI does not send unsolicited e-mails or e-mail official reports. Consumers should not respond to any unsolicited e-mails or click on any embedded links, as they may contain viruses or malware.

One example of this fraudulent e-mail message is as follows:

Subject: New DHS Report

New Usama Bin Ladin Speech Directed to the People of Europe
Prepared by DHS/I&A Intelligence Watch and Warning Division and the FBI Counter Terrorism Division

(U//FOUO) Media outlets are reporting the release of a new audio tape on Al Jazeera today from Usama Bin Ladin, in which he states that all European countries involved in the Afghanistan war should end their support of American oppression in Afghanistan. In the audio message, Bin Ladin claims direct responsibility for the 11 September 2001 attacks and emphasizes that neither the Afghan people nor the Afghan government had foreknowledge of the attacks.

////Signed////
Charlie Allen
Chief Intelligence Officer
Department of Homeland Security

As with many fraudulent e-mail messages, this message contains multiple spelling errors and poor grammar.

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FRAUDULENT E-MAIL CLAIMING TO CONTAIN AN FBI INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN FROM THE WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION DIRECTORATE

10/05/09—A fraudulent e-mail, initially appearing around June 16, 2009, claims to contain a confidential FBI report from the FBI “Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate.” The subject line of the email is “RE: Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate,” and contains an attachment “reports.exe.” This message and similar messages may contain a file related to the ‘W32.Waledac” trojan software, which is designed to steal user authentication credentials or send spam messages.

DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS E-MAIL OR SIMILAR E-MAILS, IT IS A HOAX.

The FBI does not send unsolicited e-mails or e-mail official reports. Consumers should not respond to any unsolicited e-mails or click on any embedded links, as they may contain viruses or malicious software.

Below is an example of the fraudulent e-mail:

CLASSIFIED
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
INTELLIGENCE BULLETIN
Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate

HANDLING NOTICE: Recipients are reminded that FBI Intelligence Bulletins contain sensitive terrorism and counterterrorism information meant for use primarily within the law enforcement and homeland security communities. Such bulletins shall not be released, either in written or oral form, to the media, the general public, or other personnel who do not have a valid need-to-know without prior approval from an authorized FBI official, as such release could jeopardize national security.
Link to malicious software (report.exe)

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TECHNIQUES USED BY FRAUDSTERS ON SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES

10/01/09—Fraudsters continue to hijack accounts on social networking sites and spread malicious software by using various techniques. One technique involves the use of spam to promote phishing sites, claiming there has been a violation of the terms of agreement or some other type of issue which needs to be resolved. Other spam entices users to download an application or view a video. Some spam appears to be sent from users' "friends", giving the perception of being legitimate. Once the user responds to the phishing site, downloads the application, or clicks on the video link, their computer, telephone or other digital device becomes infected.

Another technique used by fraudsters involves applications advertised on social networking sites, which appear legitimate; however, some of these applications install malicious code or rogue anti-virus software. Other malicious software gives the fraudsters access to your profile and personal information. These programs will automatically send messages to your "friends" list, instructing them to download the new application too.

Infected users are often unknowingly spreading additional malware by having infected websites posted on their webpage without their knowledge. Friends are then more apt to click on these sites since they appear to be endorsed by their contacts.

Tips on avoiding these tactics:

  • Adjust website privacy settings. Some networking sites have provided useful options to assist in adjusting these settings to help protect your identity.
  • Be selective of your friends. Once selected, your "friends" can access any information marked as "viewable by all friends."
  • You can select those who have "limited" access to your profile. This is for those whom you do not wish to give full friend status to or with whom you feel uncomfortable sharing personal information.
  • Disable options and then open them one by one such as texting and photo sharing capabilities. Users should consider how they want to use the social networking site. If it is only to keep in touch with people then perhaps it would be better to turn off the extra options which will not be used.
  • Be careful what you click on. Just because someone posts a link or video to their "wall" does not mean it is safe.

Those interested in becoming a user of a social networking site and/or current users are recommended to familiarize themselves with the site's policies and procedures before encountering such a problem.
 


September 15th, 2009

 
SMiShing attacks (also known as text phishing), have impacted cardholders of financial institutions located primarily in the eastern region of the U.S.
 
SMiSHing is a type of social engineering that uses cell phone text messages to persuade victims to provide personal information such as a card number, CVV2, and PINs. The text message may contain either a website address or more commonly, a phone number that connects to an automated voice response system, which then asks for personal information.
 
The following are examples of SMiShing messages recently sent to cardholders:
  • Text message originating from either notce@jpecu or message@cccu:

ABC CU-has-deactived-your-Debit_card. To-reactive-contact:210957XXXX.

This is an automated message from ABC Bank. Your ATM card has been suspended. To reactivate call urgent at 1-866-215-XXXX.
 

  • Text message originating from sms.alert@visa.com:

sms.alert@visa.com/VISA. (Card Blocked) Alert. For more information please call 1-877-269-XXXX.

Should you receive this type of text message, do not follow its prompts or call the number provided.  

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